Now that spring flowers are blooming the bumble bees are coming out. Now, while bees are pretty cute, they can...
Now that spring flowers are blooming the bumble bees are coming out. Now, while bees are pretty cute, they can also pose a problem for your baby.

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If your baby gets stung: First check and see if you can see the stinger. If it's there, you should see a little black dot on your tot's skin. The dot will be in the middle of the sting - usually black surrounded by redness. IF you see a stinger, remove it with a flat object, like a credit card. If you can't scrap the stinger away, you can use tweezers. Some research notes that tweezing will not actually squeeze the venom into the wound - in any case, it's best to get the stinger out, no matter how you do it. Try neutralizing the already released venom by rubbing some solid antiperspirant on the wound - weird I know, but can work. If the sting is painful, place ice on the wound for a bit. If your child is really complaining give a dose of baby acetaminophen or ibupropfen. If the sting is not painful but itchy, give a dose of antihistamine. Call your pediatrician's office to find out the best kind for your child. If your child is allergic: Very few kids end up having allergic reactions to bee stings - under 5% but if your child is in that % you'll need to take action right away. Watch for signs of:
  • Vomiting
  • Stomach cramps
  • Breathing problems - or a lack of breathing
  • Dizziness
  • Diarrhea
  • Headaches
  • Problems swallowing
If your child has one or more of the above, he may be allergic to bee venom. Go to the ER or call 911 right away! Get even more prepared for spring and summer bugs:

Tags: baby bee sting baby stung by bee bee stings can i squeeze a bee stinger get a stinger out treat bee sting


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