A piece published in the December/January 2010 issue of Nursing for Women’s Health focuses on women's weight before and during...
A piece published in the December/January 2010 issue of Nursing for Women’s Health focuses on women's weight before and during pregnancy with an emphasis on maintaining a healthy weight even before conception. In recent years, as I'm sure you've noticed, there's been an increase in prevalence of overweight and obese people in general - that includes men, women and kids. However, since we're looking at women here are some facts...
  • Approximately 51% of non-pregnant women ages 20 to 39 are overweight or obese.
  • Obesity in pregnant women is associated with baby birth defects and there's a greater risk of childhood and adult obesity in infants born to obese mothers.
  • Obese women are more likely to have an infant with a neural tube defect or heart defects than women with normal BMIs.
  • You're also putting your own health at risk by remaining overweight before you concieve. Obese pregnant women have a higher risk of pregnancy complications including gestational diabetes, hypertension, preeclampsia, induction of labor, cesarean delivery, and postpartum hemorrhage.
The study emphasizes the need for women to consult with their health care providers about what their ideal pre-conception weight should be. According to study authors, “Assisting women of childbearing age to achieve and maintain a healthful weight prior to conception will potentially minimize health risks to both mothers and infants.” Obesity is getting much closer to being the leading cause of mortality in the United States. That's lame because a healthy weight is totally attainable. Weight is an easy calculation - calories taken in should not exceed calories burned if you'd like to maintain your weight. If you'd like to lose weight then take in fewer calories then your current BMI indicates you need and exercise for 30 or more minutes a day. Your health care provider can easily set you up with a weight loss plan that's manageable for your specific lifestyle. If you're considering becoming pregnant, losing the excess weight before you conceive can mean a healthier baby and pregnancy so discuss a healthy eating plan with your health care provider now.

Tags: obese pregnancy obesity in kids overweight and pregnant overweight baby


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