CPR Gets A Life-Saving Face-Lift. Make Sure You Update How You Practice CPR.

The new 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care, published by the American Heart Association...
The new 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care, published by the American Heart Association is re-arranging the ABCs of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). baby cpr, baby is suddenly tired, baby is unresponsive, baby won’t look at me, chest compressions, child cpr, emergency baby care, how to do CPR, how to do rescue breathing, how to save a child’s life, infant cpr, my baby is not moving, rescue breathing, save your baby’s life, sick baby, suddenly ill baby ABC is now being changed to CAB. This is important news for parents, because in an emergency situation, CPR, when performed correctly, can save your child's life. It'll likely take a while for the new CAB guidelines to catch on though. For over 40 years, CPR training has emphasized the ABCs (Airway-Breathing-Compressions) of CPR, which focused on opening a victim's airway first. However, the American Heart Association now says that a safer approach is the CAB system, or Compressions-Airway-Breathing system. Why the change? The American Heart Association says, "In the first few minutes of a cardiac arrest, victims will have oxygen remaining in their lungs and bloodstream, so starting CPR with chest compressions can pump that blood to the victim's brain and heart sooner. Research shows that rescuers who started CPR with opening the airway took 30 critical seconds longer to begin chest compressions than rescuers who began CPR with chest compressions." Basically, by following the new CAB guidelines, the person you're giving CPR to stands a better chance of surviving with less injury if you immediately start chest compressions. The change in the CPR sequence applies to adults, children and infants, but excludes newborns. Compressions should be started immediately on anyone who is unresponsive and not breathing normally. Because there are often changes in infant and child CPR I highly suggest ALL expecting parents take a CPR class and then continue to update their CPR certification when it expires. It's best to take a professional class. Learn more:

Tags: baby cpr baby is suddenly tired baby is unresponsive baby won’t look at me chest compressions child cpr emergency baby care how to do cpr how to do rescue breathing how to save a child’s life my baby is not moving rescue breathing save your baby’s life suddenly ill baby


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