One In 15 American Homes Contains High Levels Of Deadly Radon

January is National Radon Action Month, which sounds obscure, but actually radon is a huge problem in the U.S., so...
January is National Radon Action Month, which sounds obscure, but actually radon is a huge problem in the U.S., so listen up to these common radon questions... What the heck is radon? Radon is a naturally-occurring, invisible and odorless radioactive gas that's highly dangerous. In fact, radon is the leading cause of non-smoking lung cancer and exposure leads to more than 21,000 deaths annually. In technical terms, radon-222 is the decay product of radium-226. Radium-226 and radon-222 are present in almost all rock and all soil and water. The amount of radon in any given soil sample depends on soil chemistry, which can vary from one house to the next. The amount of radon that escapes from the soil and gets into your home also varies depending on things like the weather, soil porosity, soil moisture, and the suction within the house. Could radon really be in my house? Radon very well could be in your house right now. One in 15 American homes contains high levels of radon. Because you can't see or smell it, you'd have no clue that your home has it, without testing for it. How do you test for radon? The EPA and the Surgeon General urge everyone to have their home tested at least every two years for radon. You can contact your state radon office for information on locating qualified test kits or qualified radon testers. What if my home is tested and does have radon? If your home tests positive for radon you'll need to contact a qualified radon service professional who knows how to get that radon out of your home. More questions? Call the radon hotline.

Tags: eco home green home home air quality radon safety


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