This week the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released some new guidelines that may change how you, and your child,...
This week the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released some new guidelines that may change how you, and your child, are using the car seat. The OLD policy about child car seats: The previous policy, released in 2009, advised that infants and toddlers are safest when they ride rear-facing until they are a year old and at least 20 pounds. The NEW policy about child car seats: According to the AAP, children should ride rear-facing until the age of 2 years. Kids should also use a booster seat until they are between the ages of 8 and 12 years and until they have reached 4 feet 9 inches tall. While the AAP advises parents to keep their toddlers in rear-facing car seats until age 2, parents must also consider maximum height and weight restrictions for a particular seat. Not all seats on the market are safe as rear-facing. Why the change? Motor vehicle crashes are still the leading cause of death for children ages 4 years and older, although many children younger are affected as well. The most current research shows that kids are safer in rear-facing car seats. For example, the APP points out that a 2007 study found that children under age 2 are 75% less likely to die or be severely injured in a crash if they are riding rear-facing. According to Dennis Durbin, MD, FAAP, lead author of the new policy statement, "The ‘age 2’ recommendation is not a deadline, but rather a guideline to help parents decide when to make the transition. Smaller children will benefit from remaining rear-facing longer, while other children may reach the maximum height or weight before 2 years of age.For more information: It's always confusing when car seat policy changes. To learn more take a look at the following resources...

Tags: baby car seat car seat is installed correctly car seat recall forward facing car seat infant car seats recalled safety check


recommended for you

Comments