Obesity Plus C-Section Creates A Negative Health Cycle

Obesity and C-sections, when linked together, may be creating a negative health cycle of sorts. [caption id="attachment_12711" align="aligncenter" width="450" caption="Healthy...
Obesity and C-sections, when linked together, may be creating a negative health cycle of sorts. [caption id="attachment_12711" align="aligncenter" width="450" caption="Healthy Pregnancy Weight Photo © Flickr user Tommy and Georgie"]calcium rich foods, childhood obesity, chubby baby, dieting during pregnancy, eat your first trimester, fat baby, folic acid, meal plan for pregnancy, nutrition for pregnancy, obese pregnancy, obesity in kids, overweight, overweight and pregnant, overweight baby, overweight kids, overweight when pregnant, pregnancy diet, Pregnancy exercise, Pregnancy health, Pregnancy nutrition, pregnancy weight, prenatal exercise, prenatal weight, what to eat when you’re pregnant[/caption] Here's a quick rundown of the facts: 1. Women who are obese or overweight during pregnancy are more likely to end up having a C-section birth. 2. In turn, a new study shows that babies born by C-section are more likely to be obese as adults than those born vaginally. 3. Which brings us back to the fact that obese women are more likely to have C-sections... and well, you get the picture. It's a spiraling health problem. In fact, weight issues are even affecting babies now - 1/3 of babies are obese by 9 months of age. Not only can C-sections possibly lead to weight issues as an adult, but C-sections are more dangerous than vaginal birth. Not to mention, C-section rates in the United States are seriously overblown in the first place, keeping in mind that a C-section is actual surgery, not some tiny procedure. There are very real C-section risks for mothers and babies. Is being overweight while pregnant really that dangerous? This isn't a difficult question - adult women, who are a healthy weight for their body type and size, are more likely to have a healthier pregnancy and an easier labor and birth experience. Fewer obese and overweight women will result in fewer C-sections and healthier babies. Now, there are advocates for overweight people, who think we should be ok with everyone, no matter their size. Acceptance of people in spite of any difference is one thing, but this isn't about being politically correct. It's a health issue. It's about healthy women, healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. An astounding amount of research backs up the fact that women who are overweight have harder and less healthy pregnancies and births. For example: [caption id="attachment_12709" align="aligncenter" width="450" caption="Fit Pregnancy Photo © Flickr user flequi"]calcium rich foods, childhood obesity, chubby baby, dieting during pregnancy, eat your first trimester, fat baby, folic acid, meal plan for pregnancy, nutrition for pregnancy, obese pregnancy, obesity in kids, overweight, overweight and pregnant, overweight baby, overweight kids, overweight when pregnant, pregnancy diet, Pregnancy exercise, Pregnancy health, Pregnancy nutrition, pregnancy weight, prenatal exercise, prenatal weight, what to eat when you’re pregnant[/caption] What you can do to have a healthy pregnancy, easier birth and a healthy tot:

Tags: childhood obesity chubby baby dieting during pregnancy fat baby meal plan for pregnancy nutrition for pregnancy obese pregnancy obesity in kids overweight and pregnant overweight baby overweight kids overweight when pregnant prenatal exercise prenatal weight what to eat when you’re pregnant


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