Search And Calculate Carbohydrate Counts & Get Other Nutrient Information For Thousands Of Foods

Just how many carbs -- and calories -- does a specific food have? Calculate carbohydrate counts and get other nutrition information for thousands of foods with this searchable index!
Search here for everything from alfalfa seeds to yogurt, and find out the carbohydrate, fat and calorie counts! If you want more detail, simply click on the name of any one of the foods listed to get a complete nutrient breakdown for that item.


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  • If your search doesn't return a result, check your spelling, try using fewer words, or consider changing the wording. For example, "vanilla flavoring" won't return anything, but "vanilla" will. ("Vanilla extract" is actually the term this system uses.)
  • Very few brand names are included in this database.
  • If you get too many food items, try a more specific keyword.
  • Only foods analyzed by the USDA are currently included in this database.

    Definition notes
    Carbohydrates: In the search results, "Carbohydrates (by difference)" is the carb content of foods by residual weight after subtracting any and all amounts of fat, protein, water and ash found in the nutrient chemical analysis. What's left over -- such as sugars, starches, fiber and trace amounts of other organic compounds -- is considered to be carbohydrate. This analysis isn't always absolutely accurate, but is the official method used.

    Calories/kcal: In the U.S., energy in foods is expressed in kilocalories (kcal). The scientific definition of a kilocalorie is the amount of energy needed to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram of water one degree Celsius from 15? to 16? at one atmosphere. The true calorie, sometimes referred to as a "small calorie," is the amount of energy needed to raise the temperature of one gram of water one degree Celsius from 15? to 16? at one atmosphere. A kilocalorie is equal to 1000 calories. While the term "calorie" technically applies to the "small calorie," in common usage, such as in reference to food energy, the term "calorie" is actually a kilocalorie. Internationally, most countries express food energy in kilojoules (kJ). One kcal equals 4.184 kJ. The USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference contains values for both kilocalories and kilojoules.PregnancyAndBaby.com

  • Tags: calories


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