Dr. Yvonne Thornton Is Clinical Professor Of Obstetrics And Gynecology At New York Medical College And Senior Perinatologist At Westchester Medical Center. She Is A Double-Board Certified Specialist In Obstetrics, Gynecology And Maternal-Fetal Medicine. S

Dr. Yvonne Thornton is Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at New York Medical College and Senior Perinatologist at Westchester Medical Center. She is a double-board certified specialist in obstetrics, gynecology and maternal-fetal medicine. She says that women need to lose the guilt if they decide not to breastfeed.
I recently interviewed Dr. Yvonne Thornton, Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at New York Medical College and Senior Perinatologist at Westchester Medical Center. She is a double-board certified specialist in obstetrics, gynecology and maternal-fetal medicine. (Translation: She's intelligent!) Dr. Thornton's most recent book, SOMETHING TO PROVE: A Daughter’s Journey to Fulfill a Father’s Legacy, was just released. I was talking to her about pregnancy and weight gain, among other things, when I asked a question about breastfeeding. She stopped me in my tracks and said,
It should always be up to the mother whether she breastfeeds. Nobody should dictate to women what they should do. Most women working outside the home these days, they have other children, the workplace doesn’t make it easier for them, etc. Women feel so much pressure to exclusively breastfeed. There is not one randomized, evidence-based medical study that compares exclusive breastfeeding with formula feeding. In fact, breast milk is deficient in Vitamin D...
I truly enjoyed my entire conversation with her. Dr. Thornton is by no means anti-breastfeeding. She is, however, very clearly pro-mom, and by that, I mean she encourages women to do what works best for them and their babies, and then offers them support for that decision. She encourages her patients to lose the guilt. There's a lot of pressure on moms in all areas of mothering. While women should always be supported, assisted and encouraged in their desire or decision to breastfeed, Dr. Thorton pointed out something that even I -- an adoptive, non-breastfeeding mom -- have possibly forgotten along the way. In our efforts to be supportive of women breastfeeding and provide information and help to accomplish that, we should take care to support moms and their decisions, period. >>What do you think? Should women feel pressure to breastfeed? Is there a valid reason for it? Or should women be given good information and help, but supported in their decision regardless of what it is?

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