Newborn babies need to become attached to at least one person who provides security and love. This first and most basic emotional attachment is the start for all human relationships.

Nancy Paulu

 

What to do

  1. Include happy rituals in your baby's schedule. For example, at bedtime, sing the same song every night, rock her, or rub her tummy.

 

  • Pick up your crying baby promptly. Try to find out what's wrong. Is she hungry? Wet? Bored? Too hot? Crying is your baby's way of communicating. By comforting her you send the message that language has a purpose and that someone wants to understand.

 

 

  • Gently move your newborn's arms and legs. Or tickle her lightly under the chin or on the tummy. When she starts to control her head, lie on the floor and put her baby on your chest. Let her reach for your nose, or grab your hair. Talk to her and name each thing she touches.

 

 

  • Sing and cuddle with your baby.Hold her snuggled in your arms or lying face up on your lap with her head on your knees. Make sure the head of a newborn is well-supported. Sing a favorite lullaby.

     

 

To entertain your baby, sing an active song. For example: If you're happy and you know it, clap your hands!
If you're happy and you know it, clap your hands!
If you're happy and you know it and you want the world to know it, If you're happy and you know it, clap your hands!

If you don't know lullabies or rhymes for babies, make up your own!

 

  • Dance with your baby. To soothe her when she's upset, put her head on your shoulder and hum softly or listen to recorded music as you glide around the room. To amuse her when she's cheerful, try a bouncy tune.

 

Feeling your touch, hearing your voice, and enjoying the comfort of physical closeness all help a baby to develop trust. PregnancyAndBaby.com

Tags: trust


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