Many women, about 50%, who develop gestational diabetes, have no known risk factors at all, so proper prenatal care is...

Many women, about 50%, who develop gestational diabetes, have no known risk factors at all, so proper prenatal care is important.

Still, there are some risk factors to be aware of that include:

  • Having been diagnosed with gestational diabetes during a previous pregnancy.
  • Being diagnosed with polyhydramnios (a way fancy name for “too much amniotic fluid”).
  • Giving birth previously to a baby weighting over 9 pounds or a stillborn baby.
  • A family history of gestational or non-gestational diabetes.
  • Being older than 25 years of age.
  • Being 20% or more over your ideal healthy body weight prior to conception.
Gestational diabetes diagnosed: If your care provider is worried because you fall into one of the risk categories above she may have you tested for gestational diabetes when you’re about 13 week pregnant. If not, you will have a test between the 24th and 28th weeks of pregnancy. Ah, the test. The dreaded oral glucose tolerance test. I still remember having to drink that sticky sweet liquid. (Take it from me, if they offer options choose the orange – not sooooo bad). As yucky as this sweet liquid is it does a good job diagnosing because it’s chock full of glucose (50g worth). 30 minutes after drinking this liquid you’ll have a blood sample drawn. This sample will show how well you metabolized the glucose. If the results of this test come back abnormal you get a second test that involves fasting before hand. If the second test comes back abnormal as well; then you have gestational diabetes. This is when you kick your support team into gear.

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