A New Study Released In Pediatrics And Summarized In An NPR Article Is Telling Parents To Chill Out. Apparently, Those Of Us That Freak Out Over Fevers Need To Calm Down.

A new study released in Pediatrics and summarized in an NPR article is telling parents to chill out. Apparently, those of us that freak out over fevers need to calm down.
A new study released in Pediatrics and summarized in an NPR article is telling parents to chill out. Apparently, those of us that freak out over fevers need to calm down.
Most fevers are caused by viruses and don't last long or cause any harm. "There is no evidence that fever itself worsens the course of an illness or that it causes long-term neurologic complications," says the report in the latest issue of the journal Pediatrics from the American Academy of Pediatrics.
Instead of focusing on the number on the thermometer, we're supposed to take a deep breath and remember that a fever is one way the body fights off an infection. Additionally, we should focus on our children's symptoms as a whole and be on the lookout for serious illness instead of becoming fixated on reducing the fever. The article didn't mention ages, nor did it note at what temperature we're supposed to lose our cool. I'll admit it. If either of my children have a high fever, I sort of panic. Then again, they rarely run fevers and on the occasions when it was high, they were very sick. Last summer, my son contracted an odd strain of hand, foot and mouth disease. By the time his fever reached 105, he was completely delirious and was seeing things. Our family doctor was concerned enough that he said if we couldn't get it down at all within the hour, we'd have to take him to the ER. And when my daughter's temperate reached 104 -- around eights months old -- it was because she was very sick and required hospitalization. At the same time, I don't panic and if my children run a low grade fever when they have a virus or infection. And while I usually give them children's Motrin, it's because they're not feeling well, not because they're running a low grade fever. Apparently, that's not the case with all parents, as the report indicates that one quarter of parents give fever reducing medication to children with termperatures below 100 degrees. How do you handle fevers?

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