Over 9,500 Children Are Taken To The Emergency Department Each Year As A Result Of Injuries Associated With Cribs, Bassinets And Playpens, According To A Study Published In The March Issue Of Pediatrics. Keep Reading For More Info.

Over 9,500 children are taken to the Emergency Department each year as a result of injuries associated with cribs, bassinets and playpens, according to a study published in the March issue of Pediatrics. Keep reading for more info.
A new study that will be published in the March edition of Pediatrics shows that cribs and playpens can be dangerous. In fact, over 9,500 children are taken to the Emergency Department each year as a result of injuries associated with cribs, bassinets and playpens. The study looked at records from 1990 to 2008 and concluded that 181,654 children under the age of two were taken to emergency departments for injuries they sustained. Since September 2007, over nine million cribs have been recalled by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission. However, not all injuries are a result of faulty equipment. Parents need to know how to properly use cribs, bassinets and playpents, as well as be aware of potential dangers. MedPage Today reports the following highlights of the study:
  • Most of the injuries involved cribs (83.2%), followed by playpens (12.6%) and bassinets (4.2%).
  • Falls accounted for two-thirds of injuries overall, although that proportion increased with age, likely because of increased mobility and climbing skills.
  • The most common diagnosis was a soft-tissue injury (34.1%), followed by a concussion or closed-head injury (21.1%).
  • The two most frequently injured body parts were the head or neck (40.3%) and face (27.5%).
  • The vast majority of children were treated and released (93.9%); 4% were admitted, transferred, or held for observation; 1.2% died; and 0.9% left against medical advice.
  • Most of the deaths occurred in infants younger than 6 months and involved a diagnosis of cardiopulmonary arrest or sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
  • Hospitalization, transfer, or being held for observation was more common in children younger than 6 months and in those with fractures.
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