Most Mamas Are Aware Of The Popular DVDs Made For Babies - The Ones That Are Supposed To Enhance Their Intellectual Development By Exposing Them To Things Like Shapes, Numbers And Classical Music. According To Research, Those DVDs May In Fact Do Nothing F

Most mamas are aware of the popular DVDs made for babies - the ones that are supposed to enhance their intellectual development by exposing them to things like shapes, numbers and classical music. According to research, those DVDs may in fact do nothing for baby's development.
Most mamas are aware of the popular DVDs made for babies - the ones that are supposed to enhance their intellectual development by exposing them to things like shapes, numbers and classical music. Well, according to a Health Day article, those DVDs may in fact do nothing for baby's development.
[R]esearchers and pediatricians have begun to question whether babies actually are learning anything from these videos. And new studies are finding that the videos are successful at keeping infants entertained but do little to help them pick up words and concepts. In fact, some researchers have found that kids who start watching baby media at an earlier age are apt to show less ability with language than kids who never were exposed to the videos or started watching later.
This does not surprise me in the least. And yet I will acknowledge that after we adopted our son, I went out and purchased about eight DVDs from a popular baby series. He was probably 12 months old at the time I bought the DVDs. As it turned out, he had zero interest in watching them. I think I only took the plastic off of one and all eight sat in a closet, moved states with us, and then finally found some use when I passed them onto a friend. It turned out that my son didn't have any sort of interest in any television until close to his second birthday, which is a good thing, because according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, children under two shouldn't watch any television. Even then, he wouldn't watch more than ten minutes at at time. I never bothered to try the baby media DVDs with my daughter, although I will admit that she was enjoying some of my son's favorite programs such as Yo Gabba Gabba along with him when she was still one-year-old -- not a great thing, but it is what it is and with a one- and two-year-old, I took the ten minutes for showers where I could get them. The researchers in the study I referred to above say that if parents are going to allow their babies to watch the "educational" DVDs, they should watch along side them "to reinforce the concepts being introduced." What do you think? Are baby media DVDs okay for babies? Have you used them (or will you use them in the future)?

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