Lawmakers In Oregon Are Considering Banning The Chemical Bisphenol A, Also Known As BPA, From Baby Bottles And Sippy Cups. Apparently, A Similar Measure Was Brought Last Year, But It Didn't Make It Out Of The Legislature.

Lawmakers in Oregon are considering banning the chemical bisphenol A, also known as BPA, from baby bottles and sippy cups. Apparently, a similar measure was brought last year, but it didn't make it out of the Legislature.
Lawmakers in Oregon are considering banning the chemical bisphenol A, also known as BPA, from baby bottles and sippy cups. Apparently, a similar measure was brought last year, but it didn't make it out of the Legislature. Many studies have shown BPA to be harmful in many ways, including affecting fertility. Through Canadian Business, the Associated Press notes:
Environmental and public health advocates say the chemical bisphenol-A interferes with hormones in young children, sometimes causing the early onset of puberty and severe health problems later in life. Opponents of a ban say there's no proof the chemical is unsafe in food containers.
BPA is used for several purposes, including hardening plastics and lining cans. As I shared in the previous post on BPA and fertility, it is present in many items, including cash register receipts, canned food, hard plastic bottles, kitchenware and DVDs, among others. If the bill passes in Oregon, sippy cups, reusable water bottles and baby bottles cannot be sold if they contain BPA, beginning next year. Given what some research shows on the harmful effects of BPA, I'm entirely in favor of it being banned from baby bottles and sippy cups, and I'd love to see all states taking the initiative that Oregon is considering. I made sure the bottles and sippy cups I purchased for my kids were BPA-free, but it would have been very nice had I known that all of my options were BPA-free. Furthermore, not all parents are aware of the potential dangers and so they don't specifically choose BPA-free baby bottles and sippy cups. And finally, this bill doesn't even address commonly used items like toddler silverware, plates and bowls. I like to hope that one day, no items will contain BPA. What do you think? Should Oregon lawmakers prohibit the use of BPA in baby bottles and sippy cups? Should other states follow Oregon's lead? More on BPA:

recommended for you

Comments