A New Study That Is Published In The April Issue Of The Journal Of Maternal-Fetal And Neonatal Medicine Found That Higher C-Section And Induction Rates Do Not Necessarily Correlate With Healthier Newborn Babies.

A new study that is published in the April issue of the Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine found that higher C-section and induction rates do not necessarily correlate with healthier newborn babies.
A new study that is published in the April issue of the Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine found that higher C-section and induction rates do not necessarily correlate with healthier newborn babies. For the study, a researcher reviewed data from 10 hospitals in a New York area. The women were low-risk and the hospitals included in the study did not have neonatal intensive care units (NICU). The C-section and induction rates were very different between the hospitals, but the outcomes didn't change. Bottom line from the study: A baby born via C-section or induction wasn't healthier than a baby born naturally.
“Whether a hospital had high or low labor induction rates or high or low C-section rates didn’t seem to make any difference to the baby,” says study researcher J. Christopher Glantz, MD, MPH, a professor of maternal-fetal medicine at University of Rochester School of Medicine. “If you don’t improve the health of the baby by doing these things, why not try for a lower rate?” (Source: WebMD)
Glantz noted that while some C-sections or inductions are necessary, people have become much more accepting of voluntary or unnecessary interventions. His hope is that less women will have C-sections voluntarily. More on C-sections

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