A Study Of Over 800,000 Women On A Danish Registry Found That Those Who Took Anti-Seizure Medication During The First Trimester Of Pregnancy - Mainly, Lamictal - Don't Have A Much Greater Chance Of Having A Baby With Birth Defects

A study of over 800,000 women on a Danish registry found that those who took anti-seizure medication during the first trimester of pregnancy - mainly, Lamictal - don't have a much greater chance of having a baby with birth defects

Topamax data still limited

A study of over 800,000 women on a Danish registry found that those who took anti-seizure medication during the first trimester of pregnancy - mainly, Lamictal - don't have a much greater chance of having a baby with birth defects. However, the findings do not extend to Topamx because only 100 of the 800,000 women who were reviewed were taking Topamax. The United States Food and Drug Administration recently strengthened its warning that Topamax, another anti-seizure drug, could increase the risk of birth defects, particularly cleft lip and cleft palate. The FDA changed it from a Category C to a Category D drug. The Danish review of other anti-seizure drugs, particularly Lamictal, found that the birth defect risk was "only slightly higher" when women took them during pregnancy. Study facts:
  • Over 800,000 live births reviewed
  • 1,000 women took Lamictal
  • 400 took Trileptal
  • 100 took Topamax
  • 60 took Nuerontin
  • 60 took Keppra
Birth defect rate:
  • 2.4% of babies not exposed to the above drugs had birth defects
  • 3.2% of babies exposed to one (or more) of the above drugs had birth defects

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