Today, And FDA Advisory Panel Recommended That Children's Acetaminophen Products Need To Have Recommended Dosing Based On Weight, Not Age, And Furthermore, They Need Dosing For Babies And Young Toddlers. Currently, The Products Don't Even Offer Dosing Gui

Today, and FDA advisory panel recommended that children's acetaminophen products need to have recommended dosing based on weight, not age, and furthermore, they need dosing for babies and young toddlers. Currently, the products don't even offer dosing guidelines for children two and under, instead stating to "ask a physician."

Panel says Children's Tylenol and other products need under-two dosing instructions

Recently, Johnson and Johnson, the maker of Children's Tylenol, announced that it would stop making Tylenol infant drops. Infant drops are more concentrated than regular Children's Tylenol. As a result, some parents were dosing their children improperly. To avoid the confusion and hopefully cut back on acetaminophen overdosing in kids, Johnson and Johnson, along with Perigo and Novartis, decided to cease production of the infant drops. However, that leaves parents in a quandary: How to determine proper dosing of the children's Tylenol (and other acetaminophen brands) for children two-years-old and under. Today, and FDA advisory panel recommended that children's acetaminophen products need to have dosing instructions based on weight, not age, and furthermore, they need dosing for babies and young toddlers. Currently, the products don't even offer dosing guidelines for children two and under, instead stating to "ask a physician."
Johnson & Johnson's McNeil Consumer Health Care, which makes Tylenol, has asked the FDA to formally amend rules governing over-the-counter products to allow for weight-based dosing and to allow the instructions on children's packages to include infant instructions. The FDA is expected to adopt many of the panel's recommendations as part of likely changes to over-the-counter drug regulations for dosing and packaging. (Source: Wall Street Journal)
I'm so glad to hear this. It's not stupidity or carelessness that can lead to a dosing error on a parent's part. When you have a sick and upset child, you're overtired and frazzled and you're trying to keep it all together, even the most conscientious parent can make a dosing error given all of the options. We often had both children's and infant Tyelonol in our home because we had a toddler and a baby at the same time. I'm ridiculously careful with medication, but I can see how easy it would be to make a mistake -- especially when both kids were sick at the same time, taking both antibiotics and over-the-counter medication. It looks like some logical might prevail here!

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