New Research Conducted By The March Of Dimes, The NIH And The FDA Found That Babies Born At 40 Weeks Are At Half The Risk Of Dying As Those Born At 37 Weeks.

New research conducted by the March of Dimes, the National Institutes of Health and the US Food and Drug Administration found that babies born at 40 weeks are at half the risk of dying as those born at 37 weeks.
New research conducted by the March of Dimes, the National Institutes of Health and the US Food and Drug Administration found that babies born at 40 weeks are at half the risk of dying as those born at 37 weeks. Although the risk is small anyway, halving it is yet another reason to allow pregnancies to continue whenever possible. This research supports doctors and hospitals that want to prolong voluntary deliveries for as long as possible. For example, a Florida hospital implemented strong initiatives to prevent deliveries before 39 weeks.
"There is the perception that babies born between 37 and 41 weeks of pregnancy are all born healthy. But this study confirms that even babies born just a week or two early have an increased risk of death," said Alan R. Fleischman, MD, senior vice president and medical director at the March of Dimes. "It is clear, that regardless of race or ethnicity, every additional week of pregnancy is critical to a baby's health." (Source: Medical News Today)
Although 37 weeks is considered full term, more and more research is emerging that suggests the closer to 40 weeks a pregnancy lasts, the better the infant's health. Read more: Higher c-section rates and better infant health not linked More c-sections, less births in the United States Prematurity awareness day

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