New Research Published In The American Journal Of Obstetrics And Gynecology Found That A Woman's Risk Of Developing Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy Can Be Predicted Up To Seven Years In Advance.

New research published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology found that a woman's risk of developing gestational diabetes during pregnancy can be predicted up to seven years in advance.
New research published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology found that a woman's risk of developing gestational diabetes during pregnancy can be predicted up to seven years in advance. How is that possible?! Apparently, by monitoring risk factors. Researchers conducted the study by reviewing the health records of 580 women from different ethnic backgrounds. The records spanned the years 1984 to 1996 and they later became pregnant. Of the 580 women, 199 ended up developing gestational diabetes and 381 women did not develop gestational diabetes.
They found that the risk of developing GDM went up in line with the number of risk factors known to be linked with diabetes and heart disease, such as being overweight, having high blood sugar, high blood pressure, and adverse cholesterol levels before pregnancy. (Source: Medical News Today)
Also interesting is that half of the women who developed gestational diabetes didn't have the identified "risk factors:" a family history of diabetes, being overweight, being a minority and previously giving birth to a large baby. According to the National Institute of Health, gestational diabetes usually develops halfway through pregnancy. Women are generally screened by an oral glucose tolerance test between 24 and 28 weeks. Blood sugar levels often return to normal after delivery (although a woman is at a higher risk of developing Type II diabetes). However, gestational diabetes poses a risk to both the mom and the baby. More on gestational diabetes Nutrition and gestational diabetes Physical activity may reduce risk of gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes screening and glucose tolerance testing

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