New Research Shows That The Number Of Deaths From Chicken Pox Has Fallen Dramatically Since The Invention Of The Varicella Vaccine.

New research shows that the number of deaths from chicken pox has fallen dramatically since the invention of the varicella vaccine.
No matter how you feel about vaccines, you'll probably find this interesting. New research conducted by the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and published in the journal Pediatrics shows that the number of deaths from chicken pox has fallen dramatically since the invention of the varicella vaccine. In fact, a dramatic reduction in deaths is sort of an understatement. Since the vaccine became routine in 1995, deaths from the chicken pox declined 88%. Yes, that's right -- almost 90% fewer people died from chicken pox. Between 1990 and 1994, .41 per one million people died from chicken pox. Remember that the vaccine became routine in 1995. Between 2005 and 2007, only .05 people per one million died from chicken pox. Even more staggering in the 20 years old and under group, the death rate from chicken pox fell 97%. The study noted that the reduction in deaths was similar for those between 21 and 50 years old. As it turns out, one varicella vaccine does not offer lifelong immunity to the chicken pox and in 2006, the CDC began recommending that people receive two doses. Read more about chicken pox The chicken pox (varicalla) vaccine Put the pox on chicken pox during pregnancy Chicken pox vaccine decreases in effectiveness after one year, but still overall effective (Source: NPR)

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