New Research Refutes Old Studies That Suggested Pregnant Women Who Work The Night Shift Are More Likely To Go Into Preterm Labor Or Have A Baby With Low Birth Weight. It Found That If Those Risks Exist, They Are Very Small.

New research refutes old studies that suggested pregnant women who work the night shift are more likely to go into preterm labor or have a baby with low birth weight. It found that if those risks exist, they are very small.
New research refutes old studies that suggested pregnant women who work the night shift are more likely to go into preterm labor or have a baby with low birth weight. It found that if those risks exist, they are very small. Researchers reviewed 23 studies that tracked thousands of expecting women and concluded that women who worked the night shift were not at greater risk for preterm labor or having a baby with low birth weight than women who worked typical 9:00 to 5:00 jobs. The research, published in the obstetrics journal BJOG, reviewed 23 studies. Each study included between 700 and 35,000 women.
When the researchers combined the results from all studies looking at preterm delivery, there was a slightly higher risk seen among shift workers -- 16 percent higher, versus non-shift workers. But then the researchers sifted out several studies they deemed low-quality -- because they didn't account for smoking and income, or relied on women's self-reports rather than medical records. Without those studies, the link between shift work and preterm labor disappeared.
The researchers found that women who did shift work were 12% more likely to have a baby with low birth weight, but "the evidence was not statistically strong, and the increased risk could be a chance finding, the researchers say." Regardless of their findings, the researchers maintain that the topic needs more attention. "In the meantime," they write, "we suggest that, it would be prudent, insofar as job circumstances allow, to permit pregnant women who wish to do so, to reduce their exposure to shift and night working." (Source: Reuters) More on preterm birth and labor Progesterone could reduce preterm births by 45% Moms need help with grief after preterm birth

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