If You Live In A City With Lots Of Traffic And Heavy Air Pollution, A New Study Has Concluded That You Could Be At Greater Risk For Having Your Baby Prematurely.

If you live in a city with lots of traffic and heavy air pollution, a new study has concluded that you could be at greater risk for having your baby prematurely.
If you live in a city with lots of traffic and heavy air pollution, a new study has concluded that you could be at greater risk for having your baby prematurely. Researchers at UCLA School of Public Health studied 100,000 births in Los Angeles County. The births all took place within five miles of air quality monitors. They found that the risk of pre-term birth increased by 30% in women who were exposed to traffic related air pollution. The researchers found that the highest rate of premature births were associated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs are found in soot and the researchers concluded that traffic was the largest source of PAHs. While chemical exposure was tied to an increase in the likelihood of premature birth, other factors contribute as well. For example, as reported by ABC, the "women living in the affected areas were more likely to be Hispanic, born outside the U.S., lower-income and have government health insurance. Because they used birth data, the researchers were unable to control for the effects of smoking as well." So, what can you do? That's the tricky part! Short of moving away from high pollution areas or staying inside, your solutions are limited. One of the researchers suggested eating healthy fruits and veggies that can help your rid your body of toxic chemicals. Also, don't smoke during pregnancy to avoid further increasing your risk of premature birth. More on premature birth Expectant moms who get flu shot have lower chance of preterm birth Blood test might predict premature birth Progesterone could reduce preterm birth

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