Even More Evidence Supports Many Doctors' Suggestion That Pregnant Women Have A Flu Shot. New Research Concludes The Flu Shot Doesn't Put A Woman At A Higher Risk For Miscarriage.

Even more evidence supports many doctors' suggestion that pregnant women have a flu shot. New research concludes the flu shot doesn't put a woman at a higher risk for miscarriage.
Even more evidence supports many doctors' suggestion that pregnant women have a flu shot. New research concludes the flu shot doesn't put a woman at a higher risk for miscarriage. This study follows others that confirm the safety of the flu vaccine in pregnant women, as well as the immunity benefits it can extend to babies after birth. "We're building a large and consistent body of evidence regarding the benefits and safety of flu vaccination in pregnancy," Kathleen Neuzil, M.D., MPH, told WebMD. Nuezil, a member of Infectious Disease Society of America's (IDSA) pandemic influenza task force and director of the influenza vaccine project at PATH, was not involved with any of the new research. For the study showing no link between the flu vaccine and miscarriage, researchers compared medical records of 243 women who had miscarried with those of an equal number who did not miscarry. They found that 38 women who miscarried had received a flu shot in the four weeks preceding the miscarriage. They also found that 31 women who did not miscarry had received a flu vaccine. Experts say the results -- 16% who miscarried versus 13% who did not -- show that the flu shot isn't responsible for miscarriage. The three percent difference is so small that it is likely due to chance. Read more on the flu shot and pregnancy March of Dimes: If you're pregnant, you should get a flu shot Expectant moms who get the flu shot have lower chance of preterm birth Flu shot improves maternal and fetal outcomes

recommended for you