A New Study Has Found That A Mom Who Loses A Newborn Baby May Have A Higher Risk Of Experiencing A Stillbirth In The Subsequent Pregnancy.

A new study has found that a mom who loses a newborn baby may have a higher risk of experiencing a stillbirth in the subsequent pregnancy.
A new study has found that a mom who loses a newborn baby may have a higher risk of experiencing a stillbirth in the subsequent pregnancy. The study, published in the obstetrics journal BJOG, looked at over 320,000 women who experienced two pregnancies between 1989 and 2005. It found that "the rate of stillbirth during a second pregnancy was just over four per 1,000 births. But the risk was nearly three-fold higher for women who'd lost their first baby before the child's first birthday, versus mothers whose first baby survived." (Source: Reuters) The researchers said they were unsure why the risk of miscarriage was greater for women who had experienced the loss of a baby during the first year. However, they suggested counseling regardless of the reason. Furthermore, the researchers said that the reason for stillbirth is unknown in 50 percent to 60 percent of cases. Because certain known factors can increase the risk of stillbirth, the researchers suggested women who have experienced the loss of a baby talk to their doctors before becoming pregnant. For example, high blood pressure and diabetes can lead to a greater chance of stillbirth. "It's not clear from the study why infant deaths were linked to stillbirth risk in the next pregnancy," Reuters noted. "But [a lead researcher from the study] said it's possible that the same underlying factors that contributed to the first baby's death - whether genetic or environmental, like poor growth due to smoking - also contributed to fetal death in the second pregnancy." More on stillbirth The devastation of stillbirth Unspoken Grief: Miscarriage, stillbirth and infant loss The House I keep: A short film on miscarriage, stillbirth and early infant loss

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