A few women, for different reasons, will have to face and prepare for a scheduled cesarean birth. Too often a cesarean birth is treated only as a medical
Giuditta Tornetta

A few women, for different reasons, will have to face and prepare for a scheduled cesarean birth. Too often a cesarean birth is treated only as a medical procedure and the sacredness of the birth is somewhat lost. A doula's emotional and informational support can help couples go through this "procedure" with a new and renewed sense of empowerment, can help preserve the sacredness of the birthing experience and help you write a birth plan. I strongly suggest you prepare a birth plan, after all, you will be under sedation and unable to express your desires for yourself and the baby during or shortly following the cesarean birth.

Cesarean birth plan questions
There are many things you should be aware of during a cesarean. The most important part of a scheduled cesarean birth plan is baby care. Here are a few questions to ask yourself before you create a plan:

  • Do you want your doula to be present?
  • Would you prefer to be awake?
  • Would you like to see and touch the baby right away?
  • How would you like the baby to be cared for?
  • Are you breastfeeding? If so, tell your birthing team you would like to breastfeed your child within an hour of the birth, even with a cesarean birth.
  • What about bottles of pacifiers?
  • Does the baby need eye ointment (since it is primarily given for vaginal births) and the Vitamin K shot?
  • Be sure to tell your healthcare team you will like to nurse before you receive pain killers.
  • What pain killers should you take and how in relationship to breastfeeding? You should be okay without them for a little while, while the baby nurses and you bond with him.

    Remember the more loving and gentle the tone of your birth plan is, the more likely you will be listened to. Bring in some treats for the nurses (box of chocolate, a gift basket) so they can munch while they are reading your birth plan.

    As a doula, I meet the couple pre-natally, help them with their birth plan and spend a couple of hours on breastfeeding and baby care techniques. I schedule to meet them at the hospital during their prep time, and guide them through a sacred ritual before the birth (it can be as simple as a prayer for a safe and medically-uneventful outcome, or something more elaborate), then I wait for the mother in recovery.

    Helping her with the very first latch on the breast is essential since both Mommy and Baby are slightly off due to medication. We seal the day with a welcoming ritual for the baby and I wait till they are safely settled in their private room. I visit once more at the hospital before they are released to discuss the birth and make sure breastfeeding is proceeding well. Finally I usually meet them at home once more to help with the transition.PregnancyAndBaby.com

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