Obstetrics and Gynecology scientists at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor recently learned that embryos growing during in vitro fertilization...
Obstetrics and Gynecology scientists at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor recently learned that embryos growing during in vitro fertilization like to be rocked much like babies who have already been born. According to the study, when an embryo is gently rocked while growing during the IVF process, it increases pregnancy rates by 20%. So far this experiment has only been tested on mice, but like many studies that are successful on animals, this may have positive results for human embryos as well. Scientists on the study note that this rock-a-bye procedure could lead to more success for IVF in humans. The reason this may work is because "Current IVF procedures involve joining an egg and sperm in a culture that incubates in a petri dish, remaining still, for a few days before the embryo gets placed into the woman's womb. That's nothing like what happens naturally in a woman's body", one of the researchers notes, "where fluids are flowing and there's always movement." Right now the success rate of IVF is low - about 36% but it's a costly procedure, so anything that could make it more successful is good news. Learn more.

Tags: growing healthy baby human embryos ivf success rocking baby


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