Yesterday the FDA approved Makena (hydroxyprogesterone caproate), a drug meant to help reduce the risk of preterm birth. The FDA...
Yesterday the FDA approved Makena (hydroxyprogesterone caproate), a drug meant to help reduce the risk of preterm birth. The FDA reports that the drug is not intended for use in women with a multiple pregnancy, such as a twin pregnancy, or other risk factors for preterm birth. According to NPR, "The March of Dimes calculates that if all the women eligible to get the newly approved drug actually did, there would be 10,000 fewer preemies a year – out of more than half-a-million born that way." Makena is the very first drug approved by the FDA that is specifically made to reduce the risk of preterm birth. It's taken some time to get this injection drug approved, but right now the FDA notes that the drug is safe enough with some common side effects such as pain, swelling, or itching at the injection site; hives, nausea and diarrhea. Serious adverse reactions were rare; there was a single report each of blood clot in the lungs (pulmonary embolism) and an infection at the injection site. American women are more likely than women elsewhere to deliver prematurely, and also, about half of premature births have no known cause. That said, this new drug may seem like a good plan for some women. However, keep in mind that while medications are useful in some cases, there are actually other ways you can help prevent preterm birth. For example, the following actions increase your risk for preterm birth... Keeping yourself healthy is an excellent way to carry your baby to full-term. Learn more about this new drug or learn about premature birth at the March of Dimes.

Tags: newborn pain pre-term baby premature babies premature baby pain


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