The uncertain economic climate has had a big effect on families in the United States. Back in 2007, births in...
The uncertain economic climate has had a big effect on families in the United States. Back in 2007, births in the United States reached an all-time high, but now, according to a study by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), those birth numbers are slumping, and some say it's due to a poor economy. Between 2007 and 2009, birth rates fell for all women under age 40, making this the biggest baby-having slump in 30 years. The authors of the NCHS report note that you can't officially link birth data and falling birth rates with the poor economy, but a report last year by the Pew Research Center disagrees. The Pew report notes a strong association between lowered birth rates and key economic issues such as income and housing prices. According to the NCHS report, key findings in the report include:
  • The birth rate for first children is down by 3%, while the birth rate for subsequent children is down by 6%.
  • Birth rates declined for all women under age 40 but some of the largest decreases were for women in their peak childbearing years.
  • Fertility rates among Hispanic women experienced the largest decline.
  • Fertility rates decreased or were unchanged in every single state and the District of Columbia, but the largest declines were among western and southeastern states.
+ Recent Decline in Births in the United States, 2007–2009

Tags: birth rates birth rates decline falling birth rate fertility decline first baby race and hispanic origin second baby state rates


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