Avoid Counterfeit “Morning After Pill”

Apparently there's some counterfeit versions of the “morning after pill” making the rounds - and you need to avoid them....
Apparently there's some counterfeit versions of the “morning after pill” making the rounds - and you need to avoid them. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning U.S. consumers not to use the emergency birth control medicine labeled as Evital. These products may be counterfeit versions of the “morning after pill” and may not be safe or effective in preventing pregnancy. Additionally, Evital has not been approved by the FDA for use in the United States. The packaging label of the potentially ineffective and suspect counterfeit version says, “Evital Anticonceptivo de emergencia, 1.5 mg, 1 tablet”, by “Fluter Domull”,(see picture below): The FDA says that you should not take the Evital product if its packaging looks like the picture above, and you need to contact your doctor or health care professional if you have taken Evital labeled as the 1.5 mg tablet and experienced any problems. Now about birth control: Birth control is important, especially since about 50% of pregnancies in the U.S. are unplanned. However, you should only get birth control from a real doctor, pharmacist, or health care professional. Same goes if you need emergency birth control. Don't ever borrow birth control or emergency contraceptives from a friend or buy them from a non-medical professional. If you can't afford birth control or emergency contraceptives, read: Where to find low-cost health care for moms and babies.

Tags: emergency contraceptives health care health care reform morning after pill preventative services safe sex women’s health


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