17 Oregon Hospitals Are Putting A “Hard Stop” On Elective Inductions And C-Sections

In September, Oregon will be the newest state trying to put an end to medically unnecessary elective inductions and C-sections. Not all hospitals...
In September, Oregon will be the newest state trying to put an end to medically unnecessary elective inductions and C-sections. Not all hospitals in Oregon are on board, but 17 out of 53 birthing hospitals in the state are agreeing to the “hard stop” method of halting early birth. What's a "hard stop" exactly? According to the Oregon March of Dimes chapter, “A ‘hard stop’ means that a Labor and Delivery Unit receiving a request to schedule a delivery by either labor induction or C-section without documented medical necessity will simply say ‘no’, and the patient will not be admitted or scheduled.” Basically, if you want an elective C-section or induction, you won't be getting one at these 17 hospitals, unless you have an actual medical need for a C-section or induction. What's the big deal - is a "hard stop" initiative necessary? It's very necessary. Not just in Oregon, but across the country, C-section rates have soared to unreasonable numbers. Not only is a C-section major surgery for the mother, that comes with plenty of possible negative side effects, but c-sections affect babies as well. In fact, the March of Dimes has a new public education campaign, called Healthy Babies Are Worth the Wait,” launching, specifically to raise awareness about the importance of waiting to give birth until your baby is ready. Why wait to give birth? There may be a medical reason why your baby must be born early. However, whenever possible, waiting to give birth until the 39th week of pregnancy (at least) is very important for your baby. The March of Dimes notes that babies born too early may have more health problems at birth and later in life than babies born full term, such as...
  • Babies born too early haven't had the time to fully develop important organs, like the brain, lungs and liver.
  • Babies born too early are more likely to have vision and hearing problems.
  • Babies born too soon often do not weigh enough to be able to easily stay warm.
  • Babies born too early often have trouble sucking and swallowing, thus feeding can be a problem.
I think it's great news that Oregon (my home state) is taking steps to help ensure healthier babies and mamas. To learn more about why it's best to avoid elective inductions and C-sections visit the March of Dimes.

Tags: complicated birth complicated labor do you need a c-section elective c-section


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