The AAP's Recommended Immunization Schedule

The AAP updated their immunization schedule on Feb 1. The new schedule indicates the recommended ages and routine administration of the current licensed vaccines through your child’s primary care provider.

baby getting vaccine

Hepatitis B (HepB)

  • First shot at birth.
  • Second shot between one and two months.

Rotavirus

  • First round at two months.
  • Second round at four months.
  • Third round at six months.

Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (DTaP)

  • First shot at two months.
  • Second shot at four months.
  • Third shot at six months.
  • Fourth shot at 12 months (or six months after the third dose).

Haemophilus influenza type b (Hib)

  • First shot at two months.
  • Second shot at four months.
  • Third shot at six months.
  • Booster shot between 12 months and four years.

Pneumococcal (PCV)

  • First shot at two months.
  • Second shot at four months.
  • Third shot at six months.
  • Fourth shot between 12 and 15 months.

Inactivated Poliovirus (IPV)

  • First shot at two months.
  • Second shot at four months.
  • Third shot between six and 19 months.
  • Fourth shot between four and six years.

Influenza (Flu shot)

  • Yearly after six months of age.

Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR)

  • First shot between 12 and 15 months.
  • Second shot between four and six years.

Varicella (VAR)

  • First shot between 12 and 15 months.
  • Second shot between four and six years.

Hepatitis A (HepA)

  • First shot between 12 and 24 months.
  • Second shot between two and six years.

Meningococcal (MCV)

  • One shot between nine months and six years for children in high-risk groups.

Catching up on missed vaccinations

The AAP suggests "any dose not administered at the recommended age should be administered at the subsequent visit, when indicated and feasible."

Following the AAP's recommended schedule

While the new schedule reflects some changes, the AAP's HealthyChildren.org reveals a national survey conducted by the University of Michigan, which consisted of 771 parents with young children (ages six months to six years). In the survey more than 1 in 10 families use an alternative vaccination schedule. The survey also revealed that a large portion of the parents were "at risk" for switching from the AAP's recommended schedule to an alternative schedule.

For those that followed an alternative vaccination schedule, 41 percent made their own schedule, 15 percent received a schedule from a friend and 8 percent used a more well known alternative schedule.

The vaccines most commonly delayed were MMR (45 percent) and DTaP (43 percent).

Note: Any significant adverse events that follow vaccinations should be reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS).

Which vaccination schedule do you follow?

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Tags: aap vaccinations


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